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Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx
Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx

Episode 114 · 2 months ago

Why Are You Cast Down, O My Soul?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Why Are You Cast Down, O My Soul?

Psalm 42

Ed Wolff - Preaching

Keep your bibles open to psalm forty two. If you were to travel to the top the extreme north of Alaska, you would find a small town called utiag Vic. I think I said that right. UTIA Vick Alaska it is. It used to be called Barrow Alaska, but the name was changed and Utia Vick Alaska is one of the most northern cities in the entire world and it is the northernmost city in the United States. It is roughly hundred miles from the North Pole. The inhabitants of UTIAG VIC number roughly five thousand and every year they get to experience something that very few people on the Earth get to experience. You see, in the not too distant future, on roughly November eighth, the Sun will set on Utia Vic Alaska and it will not rise again until roughly January two thousand and twenty three. It's called the polar night. It's the geoghs is about twenty miles north of the Arctic Circle. The Arctic Circle is that point. If you think of the Earth's axis and you think of how it's sideways like this, the the the the Arctic Circle is that point. We're on the winter solstice, the sun does not come above the horizon. The further north you are of the Arctic Circle, the more days of night that you have. UTIO VIC has roughly sixty six days of darkness. This, shall we call it a dark night of winter, has an effect on people who live in towns like utag depression rises, anxiety gets worse, mood swings are more apparent and volatile. There's a tendency to want to oversleep, there's a tendency to want to overeat. Divorce rates skyrocket, suicide rates rise, hope is hard to find for many. It's the most hopeless time of the year. Physicians have labeled this, this thing that happens every year during that polar night. They they've called its seasonal effective disorder. If you didn't catch the acronym, that's sad appropriately named. And they believe that's sad is caused because for roughly to a little over two months, people north of the Arctic Circle are not living in the light. They spend a little over two months walking in dardarkness. This morning we come back to our occasional series on the book of Psalms called the Psalms that we are singing we learned last week a song called Lord from sorrows deep by call, which is based on Psalm Forty two. And as we come to psalm forty two, what we see is a man, the Psalmist, who is walking in darkness. Now he's not walking in darkness in the sense that he is not a child of God, walking in the darkness of sin, outside of the promise of God, and he needs to be brought into the light of God and that needs to be shown into his heart. Some of you may be here this morning and you're walking in darkness in that way. We are glad you're here. If you're not a believer this morning, we are so glad that you are here this morning. There's nowhere else that we would rather you be and we pray that this morning God would open up your eyes and shine a light into your life and that you might turn and come and believe and trust in Jesus Christ and walk in the light. That is our prayer this...

...morning for you. And if that happens, please come and let us know. That's not what the Psalmist is going through. He's not walking in darkness, and also the sense of he is a believer but yet he is living an unrepentant sin. That's a type of walking in darkness that the Bible talks about. But that doesn't seem to be the case either. There's nothing in this psalm that seems to indicate he is doing anything sinful. Some of you here this morning maybe in that type of walking in darkness. Maybe you are a believer but you've fallen into some type of habitual, unrepentant sin, and I would encourage you this morning. If that is you, then turn from that sin, repent of that sin and come back to the light of Christ and walk in the light by the power of the Holy Spirit from here on out. But that's not the type of darkness that the psalmists seems to be in here. What we see aim to have as a man who is striving to live for the glory of God, striving to live for the things of God, believing the things of God, and yet there still seems to be a gloomy darkness over his soul. So what RC sprowl many times has called the dark night of the soul, that is where of the psalmist seems to find himself in this some of you may find yourself that place this morning. I want to I want to tell you something this morning. There is a bit of a Misnomer, I think, in the Christian circle sometimes that a believer, if you come to Christ and you are following the will of God and you're doing what you're supposed to do, that this won't happen, that you will not have a time of darkness and depression and hurt. Let me tell you that that is simply not true. In the title of a book by David David Murray, which I'd commend to you, a small little book, Christians get depressed. Two if you're here this morning and that's where you find yourself, you are in good company. Let me tell you this morning that that that I can attest that Christians struggle with the Dark Knight of the soul. And I can attest to that not simply because that has happened to me in the past. I can attest to it because this morning, as I stand in this pulpit, that is where I personally am walking. I don't say that for sympathy, although I do covet your prayers, but I say that so that if there's anyone in this place that is going through the same thing, I want you to hear are something. You are not alone, you're not a second class Christian, you're not an enigma. Throughout Church history we have seen people like the man who wrote there is a fountain filled with blood, like Martin Luther, like Jonathan Edwards, like Charles spurgeon, who have dealt with, occasionally and sometimes habitually, the dark night of the soul. SPURGEON, in one of his sermons, said I was lying on my couch during this last week and my spirits were sunken so loo that I could weep by the hour like a child. And yet I knew not what I wept for, but the very slightest thing would move me to tears. Have you ever been there? SPURGEON has, I have, and this psalmist...

...has. One of the things that I think brings us so richly to the psalms, one of the things that I think Causes Christians to so love the psalms, is what we see in the psalms is raw, real, authentic, transparent honesty. We see people who are children of God trying to live out the calling, live out the glory of God, trying to live as God wants them to live, in a fallen and broken world, living in the real world, going through real situations, and they are reacting to those things in brutal honesty, saying things that are in our minds but not never come out of our lips. And they are a comfort because sometimes they give voice to our sufferings and voice to our griefs. But not only that, the psalms many times do more than that. Look at the title of this Psalm, before verse one, to the Choir Master, a mascal of the sons of Cora. Now the sons of Cora were part of the political priests that were specifically they were they were supposed to take care of the musical worship in Israel, and it says that this is a mascal of the sons of Cora. Now we don't know what mascal means. It's probably a musical term, it's probably a liturgical term of some kind. The commentators do point out that it comes from a verb which means to instruct. In other words, psalm forty two, along with many other psalms, may not simply give a voice to our suffering, which they certainly do, but it seems like they may even also help us know how to live with our suffering, what to do while we are in the midst of that darkness. So this morning you may not be dealing with you may have no idea what I'm talking about, but this is still a sermon for you, because all of us go through dark times, all of us go through storms. There's a sense in which, when we come to the psalms what we are doing is we are walking in the footsteps of those who have gone before us. We see identity with them. They've been where we have been, they have felt what we have felt and they have persevered to the end. And so this morning let us put ourselves in this psalmist shoes that we might know how we might walk for the glory of God in the midst of dark times. There are basically two things I want us to see this morning. Just too. One is we will see this morning a thirst for God, a thirst for God, and secondly, we will see a hope in God, a thirst for God and a hope in God. Look at verse one, as the dear pants for flowing streams, so pants my soul for you, Oh God. How many of you are humming a song right now as the dear? Anybody Pantif for you sing along the water soul, my soul long after the that's beautiful. You know, when I was growing up singing that song and hearing this verse, I had no idea that this was in the middle of that this began a lament. I guess I always kind of thought of it a little bit like a Thomas kincaid painting, you know, like there's this beautiful forest and there's this cute little road and there's this majestic deer that comes down and there's...

...his his brook that's winding through and the sun's coming through the trees and it's reflecting off of the Stream and he comes down and he laps a little bit out of the water refreshing himself. It's beautiful, isn't it? I'd like to hang that on my wall in my office, you know, but I actually don't think that's the picture that the PSALMIST is trying to paint here. I think he's trying to paint the picture not of a lush forest, but I think he's trying to paint the picture of a drought where the grass is dead, the trees are dying and a deer comes out of those trees thirsting and panting, not because he just hasn't had something to drink in thirty minutes, but he hasn't had something to drink in days. He's dehydrated, he's weak, his mental capacities are starting, he can't walk straight, he's he's dying of thirst. And he goes to that one last brook that he knows that water normally flows in, and when he gets there there's nothing. The deer is left there to die of thirst. I think that's the picture that he's trying to show. And he says in verse two, I am the deer. I am the one who has gone out to be quenched of my thirst and I cannot find water. The stream is dry. I want to drink from the cold, crisp, clear water of of the flowing stream, but the only thing that I am tasting is the bitter saltiness of my tears. He seems to be saying I am dying of thirst. But it is not water that he thirst for. Look at verse two. Look at what he is thirsting for. He thirsts for God. He thirst for God. This word here used for God is the world or or the drivative of the word eloheim. We've talked about this before. ELOHEIM can be used in three different ways. It can be used to talk about the triune God, is a plural form of God. You can be talked about the Triune God that we worship, you can talk about the Pantheon of Gods that are out there, the false gods, or it also can talk about the angels. And just so you know that there's no uh doubt of who he's speaking of, he goes on to say my soul first for God, for the Living God. In other words, he is thirsting for the God who is alive, the God who actually exists, the God who is there. We're not talking about the Pantheon of Gods, we're not talking about Zeus or any of those other things. We are talking about Yahweh, the God who is alive. That's who he's thirsting for. But I think he's also trying to communicate something else is this is not only the God who is alive, but he is the God who gives life. Genesis chapter two, verse seven says then the Lord God, Way God Eloheim, form the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature or became a living soul. It is God who has given us our essence. It is God who has breathed life into us. It is God who has animated us. We have life because God has given us life. He is the one who has life in him. He has given us life. He will take away our life and he is the one who sustains our life. If we don't have the living water of God, we die. And what he is saying here is he's dying because he feels like God is absent. He is not able to drink from the stream of living water. What has caused him to act like this? What has caused him to have this emotional reaction? Look at the end of verse two. He says when shall I come and appear before God? That can literally be translated when...

...shall I come and see the face of God? I think he goes on in verse four to explain it a little bit further. Look at first four. These things I remember, as I pour out my soul, how I would go with the throng and lead in the procession to the House of God with glad shouts and songs of praise, a multitude keeping festival. Remember, he is a son of coral. He is a musical leader. He is remembering those days when he would lead the procession, when he would lead them in worship, when he would lead them in glad shouts and songs of praise, when the multitudes going to the temple, going to the sanctuary, the festivals, to praise and worship and honor God. And he says that's not happening. I can't go there, I can't go where God is to see the face of God. He is separated from temple worship and it is affecting his soul. We can identify, can't we? It wasn't that long ago that this sanctuary would have no one in it but the elders, where everyone was at home and we were watching church online during the pandemic. Sure, it might have been nice to roll out of bed and go to church in your pajamas without taking a shower for a couple of weeks, but didn't you feel a longing to be in this place? Didn't you feel a longing to be with God's people? Didn't you miss the Camaraderie that was here? Didn't you miss the accountability that was here? Didn't you miss the encouragement of the saints. Didn't you miss the singing of the of the Psalms Hymns and spiritual songs and our voices raised up and singing to God? Didn't you miss praying together and having someone pray over you and having the joy of praying over someone else? Didn't you miss hearing somebody from the pulpit open the word and give you the word of God in your face and not on a screen? Didn't you miss that? Did that affect your soul? Did it affect your demeanor? Did it affect your mood? Did it affect you? We no longer have to go into this building to worship God, not like the Israelites. God is with us everywhere right God is in us. The Place of worship is not the temple anymore. The Place of worship is Jesus Christ, and we can worship him in our homes. We should be worshiping in our homes, but God has wired us that we should not only worship him there. He is designed this as the means, and one of the means in which he will sanctify us, which he will prepare us, which he will help us, for him to be glorified, for us to be sanctified. We have to be here. He has called us to come together physically in worship. If you're not here, it will affect you and it will not affect you in a good way. That's why God calls us to be in community together. But but I think this is a little bit more intense than covid nineteen, because look at what is happening while he is thirsting after going to the temple. Look at what happens in verse three. My tears have been my food day and night, while they say to me all the day long, where is your God? Jump down to verse ten, as with a deadly wound in my bones. My adversaries taunt me, while they say to me all the day long, where is your God? We don't know the situation that caused the psalmist to not be able to go to worship and go to the temple, go to the sanctuary and be with God's people. We don't no. But we do know from this that, whatever the situation is,...

...those that are his enemies are using it to taunt him, to make fun of him, to tear him down by saying where is your God? This is probably more serious than just being being missing a few weeks or even months of church. This more than likely is is the psalmist in exile, somewhere where he can't go even if he wanted to? In fact, some commentators believe this almost actually written daring the Babylonian exile during one of the great exiles, which means not only could he not go to the sanctuary, no one could go to the sanctuary. There's a possibility that there is not even a temple or sanctuary that exists, that the whole system of Israelite worship has been trust to the ground. Regardless of what it is they're saying, you say you're God is good, you say you're God's in control. You say you're the chosen people of God. You say this God is living in real where is he? Why isn't he here? Why hasn't he shown up? Why isn't he helping you? What's up? That seems to be the questions. Have you ever asked that question? The psalmist does. Look at the verse nine. I say to God, My Rock, why have you forgotten me? Why do I go mourning? That go morning literally be translated walk in darkness. Why do I walk in darkness? Why do I go mourning because of the oppression of the enemy. It is like deadly wounds in my bones. It's like a stabbing him and cutting him to the heart, cutting him into his bones that will ultimately lead to his demise. That's what he's saying. These taunts are like. Have you ever gone through something and wondered God, Why have you forgotten me? Why have you forsaken me? Where are you? Lord? I know you're good, but this doesn't feel good. Lord, I know you're you're sovereign, I know you're in control, but it looks like everything is out of control. I know you're providential, but I can't see you in any of this. I know you love me, but this doesn't feel like love. I know you have promises for me, but it looks like all of those promises have failed. Have you have you been there? Have you felt the crushing weight of what seems to be the absence of God? The psalmist does, whatever situation he's in, whatever is going on. According to verse six, he says, my soul is cast down within me. This word cast down means uh to to melt away, to dissolve. Of One of the phrases that I've used before to describe what I go through personally is I will text my wife and I'll say, honey, can you please pray for me? I'm imploding. You ever seen you ever seen this when they have this huge these huge buildings and they want to demolish them, but they don't want it to like fall on all the other buildings. They set the charges around and they say just this boom goes off right and then it just collapses down into itself. That's what I feel like. Sometimes there's a boon that goes off, sometimes I know what the boom is and sometimes I don't, and I just begin to collapse into myself and Co down into the ground, cast down. My Soul. Isn't turmoil within me and I just feel crushed. That's where the Psalm is finds himself. He goes on to explain it in a very interesting way. Now I'm gonna give a Um a a warning here. Okay, the the commentators and...

...preachers don't deal much with these next few verses. So I have thought and studied and prayed and I have an idea of what I think these verses mean, but this is Ed's translation, this is Ed's interpretation. So I humbly bring it to you and say what do you think? Test this as well, as you said, test everything I say up here. But look at what he says after he says my soul is cast down within me. Therefore, I remember you from the land of Jordan's and Harman and from mountain bazaar. Deep calls to deep at the roar of your waterfalls, all your breakers and your waves have gone over me. Mount Herman was mountain in the northern part of of Israel's the northern line of Joshua's conquest, and it was the largest mountain. There snow on it all year long, I believe, and we don't know where Mountain Missouri is, but some believe it's in that same mountain race. He seems to be talking about a localized area. That localized area happens to be the place where the Jordan River starts, from the snow melting on Mount Herman to some springs that come up around the mountain. They all come together to form the Jordan River, and as they're doing that and rolling down the mountain, there are apparently places where there are waterfalls, where the where the water goes off a cliff and continues on eventually to the Sea of Galilee and onto the Mediterranean Sea. It seems like he's remembering a time when he was there, or maybe he's exiled there, I don't know. He's remembering that and he's remembering the sound, the roar that those waterfalls make. Have you ever been to Niagara Falls? Have you ever been to a large waterfall and hearing that, that thunderous roar that it makes? He seems to be thinking of something like that and he says deep calls to deep. This word deep is used many times in the Bible. One is in genesis chapter one. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The Earth, with Earth was, was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep, the waters. We heard it when we went through the book of Jonah and Jonah's prayer and Jonah Chapter two. For you cast me into the deep, into the heart of the seas, and the flood surrounded me, your waves and your billows passed over me. I think the PSALMIST is saying I have a roar inside of my heart. There is chaos inside of me and and I hear the roar of the waterfalls and I feel the chaos of that deep and and I can attribute that. I feel like I'm in the midst of that deep. My deep cause out to that deep. I feel like I'm in the middle of the river. I feel like I'm in the middle of the water, a fall, and the water is just rushing over me. The word for turmoil within me can actually be translated roar and as I am in that waterfall, as I am in the midst of that water, the breakers are coming over me, the waves are coming over me and I am drowneding. I noticed what he says in verse seven. All your breakers, all your waves. He recognizes that. This waves, this is coming from God. He recognizes that. But what he's saying is, Lord, I I want a a gentle, slowing stream that quenches my thirst. I don't want a river that kills me. I'm drinking from the fire hose here. I'm getting no refreshment. I'm just drowning, I'm dying. What I want is water that that that Quinchu is me,...

...not water that kills me. That was that seems to be what he's going through. It reminds me of a line from Samuel Taylor coolridge's poem, the rhyme of the ancient mariner. When you have this boat that's in the middle of a sea, in the middle of the ocean, and the whole crew has died, but one guy. There's no water, no water to drink, and he says water, water everywhere, and all the boards did shrink. Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink. There's water all around him, but that water will kill him. He doesn't have the water that would sustain his life. That's how the PSALMIST feels. He is thirsty for God, to be quenched by God. So what does he do? How does he continue to walk forward? Because, you see, he is still crying out to God, he is still saying you are my God. How is he continuing to do that? Will look at verse five. This is where we get into a hope in God. We've looked at the thirst for God. We're not gonna look at a hope in God. Look at verse five. Why are you cast down my soul or my soul? Why are you in Termol within me? Hope in God, for I shall again praise him, my salvation and my God. He says here that the way he is going to get through this is to hope in God. Notice he can't praise. He says I will praise again. He's not praising now. He says I must hope in God. My hope is not the situation I find myself in. My hope is not the circumstances I find myself and my hope is not my reaction to the circumstances I find myself in. My hope is not the people around me and how they approve of me or disprove of me. It's not anything else us. It's not the way I have lived, it's not my actions, it's not even my my effectiveness in hoping. My hope is only found in God, and that's it. That's what he's saying. It's God that will sustain me, it's God that will get me through. My hope is in him and nothing else, not even my ability to hope. And yet he tries, in this song, I think, to give us a few things that we can do to build that hope in the midst of dark times. Look at what he does. Look at Verse Four. These things I remember as I pour out my soul. First thing that he does is he pours out his soul to God. Throughout this psalm you see him praying to God. Many believe the psalm forty three should be a continuation of psalm forty two, and you see that again. He's praying, he's crying out to God, he comes to God and he he, he pours out his heart. He's honest with him. He asked those questions, he praised. He seeks after God. Maybe you've been there and you you don't feel like praying, you don't know how to pray, ask others to pray for you. Pray the Lord's prayer. But he's seeking after God, he's pouring out his heart to God and he's honest with God. And my my assumption here is that part of his prayer is caused me to hope. I have no hope. I can't cause myself to hope. That hope only comes from a divine act of your spirit in my life. Help me. Hope. Caused me to hope. Hope here is not it's not wishful thinking. The word hope means to wait patiently and expectedly, confident expectation. I can't praise, but I will praise again. I know I will...

...praise again. I can't imagine praising again, but I will praise again because my hope is in God and he will cause me to praise again. That's what he's saying, I think. Pray, reach out to God in prayer. And then the second thing he does here, which is very interesting, he talks to himself. Do you see that in first five? Why are you cast down all myself? He begins having a conversation with his soul. Martin Lloyd Jones wrote a priest, a very famous sermon on this text. That is the first chapter of his Book Spiritual Spiritual Depression, its causes and cures, and many of you may have heard this before, but let me read this extended passage to you because it's his comment on this and it's tremendously insightful. Have you realized that most of your unhappiness in life is due to the fact that you are listening to yourself instead of talking to yourself? Take those thoughts that come to you in the moment and when you wake up in the morning, you have not originated them, but they started thinking, started talking to you. They bring back the problems of yesterday, etcetera. Somebody is talking. Who is talking? Your self is talking to you? Now this man's treatment and Psalm Forty two was this? Instead of allowing hisself to talk to him, he starts talking to himself. Why Art Thou cast down on my soul? He asks. His soul has been repressing him and crushing him. So he stands up and says self, listen for a moment and I will speak to you. He goes on to say you have taken you have to take yourself in hand, you have to address yourself, preach to yourself, question yourself, and then you must go on and remind yourself of God, who God is, what God is, what God has done and what God has pledged himself to do. Does this resonate with anyone else? You Get up in the morning and there's these thoughts that come into your mind. You didn't side to think those thoughts, they're just there. God has forsaken me, I'm not accepted by God, I haven't done enough. That's what comes into our heads and we have a tendency, when those come in, to just lean into them. They're natural, they're just there. Must be right. What he's saying here is when that happens. No, you take biblical truth and you say no, God has not forsaken me. I may feel forsaken, but God has not forsaken me. I may feel unloved, but God loves me. I may feel cast down, but God hasn't will lift me up. I may feel like God promises, my God's promises have have failed, but God's promises will not fail. That's what he's saying. To be in the word of God, to know the word of God and to take these truths that we have in God's and errant an infallible word and to bring them to bear all our lives, to remind ourselves who God is, to remind ourselves who we are and remind ourselves what God has done for us in Christ to remind ourselves what God is doing, to remind ourselves who God is and that he will be victorious over everything, including and especially our darkness, you see. And then the third thing he seems to do here is to remember. He remembers that sweet time of worship. He remembers coming to God. Charles spurgeon again. I read earlier how he is dealt with the Dark Knight of the soul and his mornings and evenings. In January morning devotion he says this. I can't help but think that this is something that he did by experience. He says, can you not do this? Are there no murder sees which you have experienced? Though you are gloomy now,...

...can you forget that blessed hour when Jesus met you and said come to me? Can you not remember the rapturous moment when he snapped your fetters, dashed your chains to the earth and said I come to break your bonds and set you free? where, if the love of your espouses be forgotten, there must surely be some precious milestone along the road of life, not quite grown over with Moss, on which you can read a happy memorial of His mercy towards you. He goes on to say. Go back, then, a little way, to the choice memories mercies of yesterday, and, though all maybe dark now, light up the lamps of the past. They shall glitter through the darkness and you shall trust in the Lord till the daybreak and the shadows flee away. The Israelites would build altars and places where God had done miraculous things. What are the altars and your life? What are those moments when God has acted in such a tangible way? Do you remember when he saved you, when he rescued you, when he called you. He says here that that that one of the things that he reminds himself as he holds for God, is that God is his salvation, that he has rescued us, he has come to us, he has found us, he has saved us, he has come to us, he has gone to the Cross, he has opened our eyes, he has brought us into his family, he has wiped our sins away. Remember what God has done for you. What are the other times in your life where God has had sweet fellowship with you? God has done something miraculous in your life where you felt his presence, where you were, you were engulfed by the spirit, like you felt like you were walking on ere, where you could almost hear the small, still voice. What are those times? Go back to those times, because what the PSALMIST is saying here is those maybe past, but those times are coming again. M Go back, pray, speak truth to yourself and remember the only hope we have as Christians, as people, the only hope we have is Jesus Christ period. Look at verse nine. He says something very interesting here, something that might be easy for us to skip over, he says in verse nine, as He's about to ask, why have you forgotten me? Why do I go morning? He says, I say to God my Rock, my rock. He's just talked about the waves and the breakers and the waterfalls coming over him, and he says you are my rock. It's as if he is saying, because I believe this is what he's saying, he seems to be saying, yes, I am in a place where the waves are crushing me, where the waves are drowning me, where I feel like I'm going to drown the only thing that is keeping me from drowning is there is a rock under my feet and I am standing on that rock. I didn't find that rock, I didn't bring that rock. That rock found me and I am standing on it and it is keeping my head above water. It is keeping my life going. Yes, the waves are crushing over me, but I am not gonna die. This rock will stand firm when the waves come. He will stand firm when the waves subside. This rock stands steady and that rock, according to him here, I think he is saying that rock is the steadfast love of God. Remember steadfast love, remember this word. Hesson we've talked about it a ton. It is the Covenant Love of God. It is a love that God says, I choose...

...you. I love you not because of who you are, not because of what you are, not because of what you're gonna do. I love you because I have chosen to love you, and that's not ever gonna Change, no matter what you do, no matter the situation you find yourself in, no matter the situation I put into your life. That stands firm and that rock of God's love gets us through everything, even when all things look hopeless, because that rock will not move. What are we sing we sing it last week on Christ the solid rock I stand. All other ground is sinking sand. All of the ground is sinking sand. The only thing that will get us through this, the only thing that will get us through life, is the rock of Christ. Our hope is found only in him. You see, Jesus came and, according to the Bible, he was a man acquainted with much grief, a man of sorrows. He was forgotten by all around him. He cried tears. His soul was in turmoil within him, so much that those tears were like drops of blood and Gat smine. He was cast down and beaten, he was broken, his skin was torn. He was lifted up on a cross and on that cross he thirsted. He was mocked. Where is your God? Come down off the cross. He was mocked, spit on and in that moment on the cross, mysteriously, there's no way to fully comprehend this, but somehow, on the cross, God the Father Forsook God the Sun, and he drowned it in the waves of God's wrath. On the Cross for you, for me, for all who might come and profess Christ. He did that for us. And then three days later he rose again from the dead. And when he rose again from the dead, he defeated our sin, he defeated our darkness. He was victorious. He he rose to take away our grief. He rose to quench us with living water. He rose to dry our tears, he rose to lift US up. He rose to heal our wounds. He rose to defeat our enemies and the mockers that come against us. He came to terminate our turmoil, he came to rescue us, to save us, to bring us hope. He rose to be our God. That, and that alone is where my hope lies, not in anything else but that the people who live in Utiag Alaska, they experienced the polar night, but there's also something else they experience. They experienced something called the midnight Sun. On May eleven the Sun will rise in new Tiagh and it will not set until August one, eighty some odd days of always walking in the light. I've been told this week that I say some things over and over again and I don't say something. I don't say much. That's new, but there's some truth to that. I think I've quoted from revelation one or twenty two every sermon that I have. Well, here we go again, and I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God, the Almighty and...

...the lamb, and the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it. The glory of God gives it light and its lamp is the lamp revelation twenty two. They will see his face and his name will be on their foreheads and the night will be no more. DAX reminded US last week, and I hope this is a decent paraphrase, that that that that we aren't any earthly good unless we are quite heavenly minded, as Jesus came to his disciples in the upper room and said, let not your hearts be troubled. That's what he's saying to us, even in the midst of our troubled hearts. How can that happen? Believe in God, believe also in me. Hope in me, he says, hope that I will rescue you, hope that I will save you, and hope that there is that I am leaving here to prepare a place for you in the father's house where there will be no sin, where there will be no darkness, there will be no depression, there will be no dark knights of the soul. All will be light, the light of Jesus Christ. That is what is coming, and our hope is that there is coming a day when he will come back for us and he will take us to that place and we will be with him forever, where there is no night. That is our hope. Whatever you're going through, it is temporary. God is even using it mysteriously to prepare us for that place. Is Temporary. He is coming again for all our darkness and sorrows were taken away. Let's pray. It's gracious God. We come to you and we confess our lack of faith and our lack of hope. We know that you are the one who gives us hope and, Lord, we asked this morning that you would do just that, that you would give us hope. I pray right now for anyone that is going through a dark night of the soul or going through a tough time, that you would that your spirit would specially be upon them, fill them, comfort them in the ways that only only you can. And we confess, Lord, that even these things that we've mentioned, to remember, to cry out to you, to hope, to apply the truth of the AUSTAL and in the in the Bible to ourselves. We can't do this on our own. This is only an act of your spirit. It's up to us. We won't do it. It's up to us. We'll lean into those thoughts, we will not take them captive. Lord, strengthen us, help us to take those thoughts captive, help us to hope, and you.

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