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Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx
Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx

Episode 102 · 5 months ago

The God Who Knows

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The God Who Knows

Psalm 139:1-24

Dax Bryant - Preaching

On occasion something significant happens in our culture that interrupts my previously scheduled sermon series. In fact, this has only happened. This is only the third time that I've ever done this. It's not our practice to respond to every headline from the pulpit. I think that would be unwise and foolish, and nor do I think you need my hot takes on everything that happens in the world around us on Sunday morning. But I do always want to be flexible enough to break away and address a particularly momentous issue if the spirit of God compels me to do so. And so on Friday morning I thought this might happen. Friday morning when the Supreme Court rule to overturn Roe v Wade, praise God, I thought this is one of those times. We can't let this occasion pass and not address it. But what happened Friday is a historic occasion and it is worthy of bringing God's word to bear upon it, because God is not silent on this issue of life. And I will get ahold of myself here in a moment, but even as I say that, I need to repent of that, because it is right to respond with emotion and tears of joy. So I would it's this, it's my ugly cry face that I'm conscious of. So we're pressing pause on our series through the Gospel John Today and, as you notice, we're gonna be looking at what God has for us in Psalmn one thirty nine this morning. UH, as I mentioned, it is our practice to preach consecutively through books of the Bible. Uh, I am not a fan of jumping off and finding a text to support what I want to say, to to meet my agenda. But but this is the passage that God brought to mind. I won't speak all about abortion, because this passage doesn't speak all about abortion, it doesn't mention the word abortion, but I will speak to the issue of life in the womb by way of exhortation and application. Actually, it wasn't this whole passage that came to mind. It was part of one verse that came to mind. But, as always, as we work our way through God's word, my desire is to expose it, the word of God, so that we can understand it and apply it to our lives and so that we can see Christ in the midst of it. And so I think we can accomplish both of those things this morning, by God's grace. So will you pray with me to that end here? M God, you are our maker, we are the clay, you are the potter. We are made in your image and in you, Oh God, we live and move and have our being. You've appointed the times and places in which we live that we might seek you. We might plan our own way, but it is you, Oh God, who establishes our steps. You know US better than you know ourselves, and it is only by your mercy that we are not consumed, because your compassion never fails. It is new every morning and your faithfulness is great. And so, God, we have gathered here as your people to honor you, to worship you, to submit to you and to hear from you. For your names Sake, may it be so. Amen. One of the unfortunate results of our fast paced, technology driven, consumer oriented culture is the increasing sense of D personalization. To the doctor, you're an insurance number. To the retailer, you're a credit card number. To the politician, you're a voter, you're an email address, you're a follower, you're a subscriber. Even when we speak about the Holocaust of abortion that was federally mandated across this country for nearly fifty years up until two days ago. We typically reference a number that it by its very nature, is de personalized. We speak of...

...the number sixty three million. But Sixty three million? What? At least sixty three million, probably more, individual human persons created in the image of God and murdered in the womb. You can see how this phenomenon of depersonalization can very quickly become dark and disturbing. Most of us like our privacy. In fact, if you don't know this, I'd encourage you to go do a little bit of research this afternoon. It was the non existent right to privacy that was inserted artificially into the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment back in nineteen seventy three that established the crumbling foundation for Roe v Wade in the first place. But but one of those results of increasing privacy that we so enjoy, one of the results of becoming increasingly anonymous, is that people, even people who are very close to you, don't really know you. They know where you live, they know what you do, they know, certainly the image that you portray. But how many people really know you. And we may think we like it that way, but but I contend that deep down one of the longings of the human heart is to be known, to be genuinely and thoroughly known, including all of the good and the bad and the ugly that comes with that. So so what do you think? Is it possible for someone to really really know you in this fast paced world that we live in? And this is what Psalm one is really about, someone who knows you better than you know yourself. So we're gonna look at this song together. I want you to notice, first of all, how it begins and how it ends. Notice how the song begins in Verse One. Oh Lord, Yeahweh you have searched me and known me. So this is something that has happened to David in the past. You have done this. And now look at how the song ends in Verse Three. Search me, Oh God, and know my heart. He repeats himself, but not exactly, because here it's not in the past tense. It's something that David wants to keep happening to him in the presence. So he says in the beginning, you have searched and known me. At the end, keep on searching me and knowing me. So we've got these two book ends that are framing this whole song to draw your attention to the main theme that is contained in the middle, a theme that can be understood, I think, just by asking this simple question, how intimately does God know you? And I want to offer three answers to that question, followed by three appropriate responses to those answers. How intimately does God know you? First of all, God knows you exhaustively. God knows you exhaustively, and David is mostly happy about that. He says, oh Lord, you have searched me and known me, and the idea here is that you've known me because you've searched me. But remember, this is poetic language here. God doesn't need to go searching for information that he doesn't already know, like he needs to find something out. He already knows everything. David here is using language that we can understand to help you see the extent to which God does know you, and and the picture he paints. It's like he is prying into the deepest, innermost parts of your being. And notice how personal this is. Notice the pronouns that are used here. I you, my these are very personal things. It's repeated over and over again. Let me read that and point those out. Oh Lord, you have searched me and known me. You know when I sit down and when I rise up. You discern my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. How exhaustively does God know you? David? He uses here a figure of speech that's called a mayrorism, which is simply using too contrasting words...

...that are meant to be taken together to refer to everything that lies in between them. So we might, we might say something like this, Um, when you say I looked high and low for something, I couldn't find it, meaning you looked for you looked everywhere for that thing we sang earlier, uh, in one of the songs that we're saying come, young and old, from every land, come all people. Right, that's that's how this is used. It's the same thing here in verse two, when he says you know when I sit down and when I rise up, in other words, you know when I rest and when I move and, by implication, everything that happens in between. Again, in verse three He flips it. You search out my path, my going and my lying down, so you know when I move and when I rest and, by implication, everything that happens in between. The point here is that God knows everything you ever do and beyond that, God knows everything you ever say, even before you say it. Noticed verse four, even before a word is on my tongue. Behold, oh Lord, you know it altogether. How is this possible? It's only possible because God's knowledge of you extends to your very thoughts. Did you catch that? It's in verse two. Also, you discern my thoughts from afar. You ever found yourself in the midst of a heated discussion and, almost like it was an out of body experience, you saw yourself saying something that you never would normally say. What you said even surprised you. But God has never surprised at what you say. He's never caught off guard by your words. To him, even your thoughts are an open book, which means you don't have the privacy that you would like to think that you have. God has ultimate clearance to access every thought that you've ever labeled classified or top secret. His complete access to every nook and cranny of your mind. Now, delightfully that means that he knows every God honoring, God glorifying thought that you ever have, even if you never verbally express it, the things that no one else hears. Disturbingly, though, that also means that he sees every soul condemning thought you ever have, even the ones that no one else could ever imagine. Your lust for the woman you work with you're agreed for the money that you could easily embezzle, your jealousy for the friend who is now pregnant like you hope you could be. Your bitterness toward a colleague who got the promotion that you deserved. God knows these things. None of this is hidden from him. He knows, he knows everything you do, ever say and ever think, and he knows it better even than you know yourself, because he also knows perfectly all the reasons why, all the motivations for why you think these things, every rationalization, every justification you make, God knows. So tell me, friends, does that feel a bit invasive, intrusive? Even if so, I submit to you out of experience that it's only because you're ashamed of what there is for God to Oh. Job Felt the same way. He was frustrated that God was always watching him. You're not the only one to find this idea unsettling. David even says here in Verse Five, you him me in behind and before, in other words, David saying I can't escape God by turning back, he's already there, and I can't escape God by running ahead, because he's in front of me too. I'm I'm himmed in, I'm I'm completely surrounded, I'm inclosed by God. There's no escaping he's everywhere that I look. And I think the reason that sometimes we we hate that claustrophobic feeling, is sometimes because we want the room to sin. You him me in behind and before you lay your hand upon me. Now what's interesting we see this throughout this psalm, but especially here. Both of those phrases in that verse, they can be used and they are used in scripture either positively or negatively. You him me...

...in that that can mean you're so close to me that I am certain that you will always care for me and protect me. That sounds Nice, but it can also mean you you have me so surrounded, you have me so figured out that I can never escape you. You lay your hand upon me, that that can mean you will always look out for me, you're protecting me, but it can also mean your hand of discipline cannot be outrun. So so how are we to take these words? How do we understand this? Is it positive or negative? Is it a cause of comfort for you, or is it a cause of dread and and the beauty I think of this Psalmn? The answer is it depends. Should you be terrified of this only for as long as you remain guilty and unrepentant? It really comes down to your present relationship with God. That determines whether this is positive or negative. In your case, your present relationship with this God who knows you exhaustively. And all David can say in light of these truths is in verse six. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me. It is high. I cannot attain it. So how intimately does God know you? Our first answer is God knows you exhaustively. Secondly, now God is with you inescapably. It's one of the reasons why he knows you so intimately. Noticed for seven. Where shall I go from Your Spirit, or where shall I flee from your presence? And what's the obvious rhetorical answer? Nowhere, nowhere. There's nowhere in all of creation that you can hide from God. Now David's gonna he's gonna prove that he's gonna develop that idea by by drawing our attention to some places where, maybe hypothetically at least, it might be possible to escape from God. So first he talks about the the vertical realm. He says, what if? What if I can climb higher than God can reach? In Verse Eight, if I ascend to heaven, you were there. Well, what if I go so low that maybe I can be out of his grasp there? If I make my bed in Shiol, the grave? You were there. So the the vertical escape, going either up or down, that won't work. What about the horizontal escape? What if he heads to the east or to the West to flee God's presence? Notice verse nine. If I take the wings of the morning, that's a phrase poetically that describes the rays of the sun flashing across us the morning sky. David could flee in that direction, of the direction of the sun rise to the east. Or verse nine continues. He could dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, more literally, dwell on the far part of the sea and from David's geographical perspective, that's the Mediterranean Sea. Of course, if you could somehow cross that great body of water to the West, then maybe he could escape God. Too Bad Jonah wasn't around yet for David to ask how that might work out. But of course David already knows whether I go to the east or to the west, up or down. Verse Ten. Even there, your hands shall lead me and your right hand shall hold me. And make sure you get the picture here. It's not so much that wherever you go, God is going to chase you down. The point is he's already there when you get to wherever you're going. So up or down won't work, east or West won't work. Maybe there's a better idea. Did you ever when, when you were a kid, pull the blanket over your head when you were scared or or maybe in a game of hide and seek? You thought that just covering yourself kept you safe, kept you hidden out of sight? And you probably don't do that anymore as an adult, but is it really any different than what you might still sometimes tell yourself that if I do this in the darkness, then no one will see notice. Verse Eleven. If I say surely the darkness shall cover me and the light about me be night. If I pull the blankets over my head, even the darkness is not dark to you. The night is bright as the day. For Darkness is as life. Eight to you. We all know that. We all know...

...that phrase. Like father, like son. Right it means there's there's no difference between the two, and that's exactly what he means here at the end of verse twelve when he says, for darkness is as light with you, like darkness like light for God. There's no there's no difference between the two in terms of what he can perceive. He there's no limits on his site. So again is David stating this in a positive way? Wherever, wherever I might go, wherever life may lead me, I'm never separated from you, God. Or does does he intended to be a bit more unsettling? After all, in in these verses here, versus seven through eleven, he talks about fleeing, going away from covering or or or, better yet, hiding. So so maybe he's saying, wherever I try to go, I can never escape you, God. Which is it? Is this a source of comfort, or is this a source of dread? And again it depends upon the present nature of your relationship with this God who is everywhere with you. So how intimately does God know you? He knows you exhaustively. He is with you inescapably. And now, thirdly, to to illustrate just how well God knows you and how thoroughly he is with you, David adds this point that God has designed you meticulously. Notice verse thirteen. First Word is four. It's a connecting word here. So, based on what David said earlier, that God is everywhere present with you, here is how extensive and intimate that presence is. For you formed my inward parts. You knitted me together in my mother's womb. Job Says you clothed me with skin and flesh and knit me together with bones and sinews. Scripture speaks of the Prophet Jeremiah and the Apostle Paul being set apart by God before they were born. John the Baptist, we know he leapt for joy in his mother's womb at the presence of Christ. So what does all of this mean? It means that our loving and creative God crafts people together with great care and wisdom while they are still in the womb. That means you're not a random accident of the cosmos. It means that your creation by the great designer began before your birth. Look at those words formed knitted together. It points to God as as sort of a divine artist, a a mass your craftsman, who is skillfully designed as his masterpiece. You, the color of your hair, the color of your skin, the color of your eyes. You're unique, intelligence and and interests and personality, your particular gifts and skills and abilities and interests. And what should your response be to this great truth, to to the God who made you? And we see the first of three responses now to God's intimate knowledge of you, starting here in verse fourteen. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. The human form, as handcrafted by God, Causes Wonder and awe and astonishment, and so the right response that God's creation demands first of all is praise and adoration, something you've experienced if you ever even looked at an ultrasound, I'm sure, which is why David then says, wonderful are your works. My soul knows it very well, and this is the phrase that that came to mind on Friday morning, and I want us to think about these words here for a moment, if you'll permit me to apply this phrase to the topic of the fight for life in this context and make some application and hopefully, encouragement and exhortation here. I want us to think about wonderful are your works? My soul knows it very well, because I think this is fundamentally why many Christians have prayed and marched and fought for the reversal of Rob Wade for decades, because our souls know...

...very well the wonderful works of God that are in the womb. But this is also true those who advocate for the murder of a baby in the womb, and I do think we need to call it what it is. Their souls also know very well, though they may suppress the truth, they know very well that an unborn baby is a wonderful work, a person made better yet, formed and knitted together by God, their creator, fashioned in his very image, which means that to intentionally kill a preborn human being is not just a morally reprehensible sin, it also demeans God and it contradicts the Gospel. I've heard it said that that abortion is the the evil reverse image of the Gospel. Instead of the Gospel message of I'll die for you, abortion says you die for me. and and though that disastrous Roe v Wade decision has been overturned, that that is something that we celebrate, rightly, something we thank God for. Lives will be saved, but we also need to understand that that does not mean that abortion is going away either, not not even in Texas, and neither are all of the sinful issues that lead to and results from abortion going away. And so what I want us to think about together for these next few minutes is where do we go from here? How do we respond? And, quite honestly, brothers and sisters, I've struggled here, as I've only have been working on this for a day and a half, to articulate how to come at this because, on the one hand, I know that many of you are already deeply involved in the fight for life, the fight against abortion, and I don't want to imply that you're not doing enough. On the other hand, I know that that many of us are not very involved or not involved at all, and so I feel like you need to be encouraged and exhorted to be involved at some level. It's not gonna look the same for everyone. So the question is, what does that involvement look like? What does it look like individually for you? What does it look like for us together as a church? And as I as I thought about this and and and rewrote it several times, I was comforted by the fact that I don't think we need to reinvent the wheel here. The landscape has shifted, but I don't think that our approach needs to shift as much as we might think at first blosh. Let me give you a few things that if you were doing these things already, you ought to keep doing them, and if you weren't doing them yet, you ought to start doing them. And my hope hears that I can give things that we could all participate in at some level. There's not gonna be nothing earth chattering. The first thing is pray. Pray for unborn babies to be rescued from abortion here and across this country. Pray for women who are considering abortion to change their minds. Pray for people who may be pressuring a woman to get an abortion to stop that. Pray for a change of heart. Are All who advocate and try to legislate abortion pray for the safety of the workers at pregnancy care centers who are under attack in some places simply because they're there to help women deal with babies that are saved. Pray for it Supreme Court justices to be safe from threats against their life. There are many things we can be praying for here. That's the first thing we ought to all be doing. Secondly, call for repentance, and I think this starts right here. Call Christians, call yourself perhaps, to repent of whatever apathy we've had towards abortion. Call others for repentance from sexual relations outside of marriage, that...

...of abortions result from that dynamic. Women who are acting selfishly, men who are acting selfishly as if there's no recourse or responsibility. Call them to repentance. Call for repentance from any godless, selfish worldview that leads to abortion. Call for people who are complicit in abortion to repent of the sin of murder and pray that they would face justice according to God's law and the law of the land. What else can we do? We can speak the truth and love. I think part of that is calling abortion what it is. It is murder. That is not unloving to say we can, and just by the way, if if you are if you have family members or friends, like I do, who have an opposing view on this issue, don't it always comes back to, I think, what we call the US. We can. We can sanitize the language and clean it up and make it about health care decisions and reproductive rights and all these things that skirt around the issue of what it really is. Always bring it back to this is murder of a human being that is loving. To speak that truth. What else can we do? Cry Out for justice, Advocate for justice. We can love your neighbor right so that you will be the kind of person that perhaps a pregnant mother in crisis would seek out and approach because of your love that you've displayed towards them. What else should we do? Trust that the battle belongs to the Lord, that the victory has been assured because of what Christ has accomplished, that that one day all sin and suffering will be gone, but until then we work towards that. That includes supporting policies and leaders who condemn abortion and stand for life. I think one area that needs work, and I don't know how to do this or where to start, but maybe someone does, or at least we can hitch our cart to someone who does. Is We need to work to change systems that make adoption more affordable and accessible, that that fixed the broken system of foster care, where it is frustrating and invasive. What else should we do? Get involved with local crisis pregnancy centers with your prayers, with your finances, with your times, with with your skills. Did you guys know that there's a group of churches here in town that are that are getting serious about starting up a crisis pregnancy center right here in Gatesville? That's that's happening. There's another local ministry which primarily serves abused women and they're expanding their work and that may very well overlap at times with with these same issues. Now I'm just like you when I think about the the scale of the need. It is overwhelming. What can I do where? Where could we make a difference? Think about what's going on in our nation and we know that none of us can do everything in every place. But might God lead you to do something right here? Might God lead us as a church to be involved in some way right here? I'll just say if, if God is moving on your heart, that you want to adopt a child that was saved from abortion and you can't afford it, come tell us that won't be an obstacle. These are things that we can do. At least one of these things I've listed is something you can do. And above and under and all around all of these things is this. We Must Proclaim The Gospel loud and clear to all who are involved with the sin of abortion, and just statistically speaking, that it probably includes someone or a few people in this room. There's nothing different or special about us in this room other than those who have been saved by God. So even as we rightly seek to hold people accountable for the sin of abortion, we must be careful not to frame abortion as the unforgivable sin either, because God often delights in forgiving the very kind of people that we think are unforgivable. And so...

I don't know if there is anyone here who needs to hear this today, but I'll say it just in case. If you repent of your sins, including the sin of abortion, and seek refuge in Jesus Christ, you will find that his gracious pardon far exceeds the guilt that you may carry. What does it look like? To speak the truth and love. It's this proverb six seventeen, says that God hates the hands that shed innocent blood. But you also need to know that the blood of Christ is the only blood that can wash the blood away from your hands. And so if this is you, in light of your sin, there is no one else to turn to but God, the God who knows you exhaustively, the God who is with you in escapably, the God who designed you meticulously to be pro life church. That doesn't mean that we're just trying to save lives, though we certainly are trying to do at least that, but our ultimate goal is to introduce people to the only one who can save souls, and God willing. With the lives that are saved, there are more people to witness to that God will save eternally. So listen in this I'm not calling us to do anything that's that's new, but maybe what I am calling us to do is to renew our commitment to lead the way against the cultural headwinds that are blowing in the opposite direction and model the way of Jesus on this issue. We praise God for what he's done this week. We celebrate that victory, but we dare not let our guard down or put our feet up. So let's let's keep doing what many of us have been doing, in building a culture of life that, by God's grace, will collide with the culture of death to affect change. So what do we do? We pray, we call for repentance, we speak the truth and love, we cry out for justice, we love our neighbor, we get involved in the fight and over all of it, we cover. We cover it with the proclamation of the Gospel. Whenever God grants the opportunity, we meet sinners with the message of salvation that is anchored in the substitutionary death of Jesus Christ and authenticated in his glorious resurrection that promises to bring sinners home. Tell sinners that nothing they have done is beyond God's forgiveness if they trust Jesus with a repentant heart. Declaring that good news is our highest calling. And here's why we do it. Wonderful are your works. My soul knows it very well, since we all know the preciousness of these little ones deep down in our souls. Let us continue to fight and love and press ahead in this battle. There is much good work to do. God has provided his church with a remarkable opportunity that I did not think I would live to see, and so let's not waste that. Back to our text, David continues this picture of intimacy Verse Fifteen. My frame was not hidden from you when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Again, this is poetic language. Here it's revealing to us that that God's design studio, if you will, is the hidden interior of a mother's womb, a concealed and mysterious place, but not to God. Right notice. First to ex teen, your eyes, God, your eyes saw my unformed substance. That means even before my mother knew I was there, God, you saw me. And here's something else that's amazing, because many people actually are happy to acknowledge God's meticulous design of them in the womb. But that's not where God's meticulous providence ends. It also includes not just their design in the womb, but in God's for ordination of their future. And this is something that people can be unhappy about, but, friends, it's what the text says. Still in Verse Sixteen in Your Book were written every one of them the days that were formed or, better yet, the days that were ordained for me. And when did this happen? This for ordination, in those days when, as yet, there was none of them? So not only has God brought you into being,...

...he's given you an allotted time to exist on this earth. You're not simply pre known by God, but every day of your life has been preordained by God. That's what the text says. Do you realize what it means? It means that, despite the tragedy that is a part of all of our lives, there is nothing random or accidental about your existence. Your life has a purpose. Every day that God gives you life is a day that he has designed for you. His plan for you extends from the womb to the tomb, and nothing can prematurely in God's ordained plan for you. There are no accidents. Now, can we fully explain that? Can we get our head all the way around that? No, which is precisely David's point, because this reality is is not something that is to be understood so much as it is to be praised and adored. He says in verse Seventeen, How precious to me are your thoughts o God when he's saying, well, when I think of how you made me, how you've ordained every day of my life, even before I was born, that is mind blowing. How vast is the sum of them? He says, if I would count them your thoughts, they are more than the sand. This is a response of praise and adoration. And then he says, at the end of verse eighteen, I awake. I awake, not like you, who might need to wake up from a nap. In scripture, sleep is often a synonym for death. Right. We know this. To be awake, then is to be alive, and I think it's possible from the context here that that perhaps this, this points us to a sort of dim shadow of the resurrection. See if this makes sense. David said, God has formulated your existence. He's for ordained all of your days for the future, whether that's one day or a hundred days or a hundred years. But God's plan, it's not just confined to this life. He's not done knowing you, even at the point of your death, because the end of your days will eventually be met by the Great Day, the day of Resurrection. And what will you discover on that day? The text says I awake and I am still with you. God's intimate knowledge of you, believer in plan or you, covers you from womb to tomb and beyond again. Ask yourself the realization that after death you will stand in judgment before your Creator, who gave you life, along with every day you ever experienced. Is that good news to you or is that terrifying news? which is it all again? It depends upon the present nature of your relationship with the God who has designed you meticulously. To God, you are not a statistic, you are not a social security number, you are not a collection of body parts. You are known by him intimately. Should this make any difference to you? Should it provoke some kind of response? Yes, according to David, we should respond initially with praise and adoration. This is a model for us. How David Responds here? Firstly, with praise and adoration. Secondly, much more briefly, his second response is fierce loyalty. Fierce loyalty. Look at Verse Nineteen. Oh that you would slay the wicked, Oh God, Oh men of blood, people who kill other people, blood thirsty people. Think about how this applies to the dynamics going on in the country right now. With with Roe v Wade overturned, oh men of blood, depart from me. They speak against you with malicious intent, your enemies. Take your name in vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, oh Lord, and do I not loathe those who rise up against you? I hate them with complete hatred. I count them my enemies. Now, this kind of language in the psalms what we call imprecatory language, cursing language. It often raises a lot of questions for people. People find this troubling. I don't have the time to get into this, but for now I want you to simply consider this as as you look at those words. How does David describe the people that he mentions in these verses? Look at it. He calls them the wicked men of blood,...

...those who speak with malicious intent, enemies, those who hate, those who rise up against God and once again, enemies. Friends. These are not good, upstanding, innocent people. These are not even neutral people being described here. And and who is it that the people are set against? Notice first twenty. They speak against you. He's addressing God. They speak against you with malicious intent, your enemies, God, Take Your name in vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, oh Lord, and do I not loathe those who rise up against you? David's talking about people who are open and unashamed in their hatred of God. And why point this out? Why is this here? I think we need to understand that, that this prayer for judgment here is not driven by David's self interest. It's not driven by David's desire for revenge or retaliation against those who have wounded him. It's driven by David's zeal for God, for God's glory, for God's name, for God's honor, for God's reputation. Does that remind you of anyone? Perhaps David's greater son Jesus, who so closely identifies with and and loves God that he personally feels offense against God. And so, for example, in his zeal for the glory of God, He fashions a whip and drives the money changers out of the temple. And I think a question worth asking church is where do we see this today? Where do we see this passion and zeal and righteous younger today? And, as I said, we want to speak the truth and love. We do not want to unnecessarily be an offense, but I wonder sometimes if our politically correct, post postmodern culture has made us skittish about taking a stand for anything. Did you, in in the wake of Roe v Wade being overturned? Did you, whether you're in social media or not, did you hesitate for a moment? Did you think maybe I ought not to say anything about this because it's going to bring heat my way? Our culture tells us it's it's better to be accepting of everything, and if you can't accept everything, then at least you ought to stay quiet. But, brothers and sisters, I feel your pain, but also please hear me. That attitude will change nothing. What what we need in our battle for the heart and minds and souls of depraved people is an unrestrained zeal for the glory of God. To be unashamed in our approach, we need young men and young women with a passionate zeal for God. If you don't, you don't feel that passion, ask God to make you passionate. God has created this universe with a moral order to it, and when a person sets himself against it, to participate in injustice and unrighteousness and oppression, mocking and defying God, shaking his fist in God's face. That person, according to scripture, makes himself God's enemy. In fact, according to Psalm Five, verse five and and a few other places in scripture, God hates that kind of person. Now we need to clarify. God's hate is not like our hate. Our hate is still tainted by sin. God's hate is holy and perfect. But we need to be careful not to let bumper sticker or fortune cookie theology trump what scripture says. Right, it's it's not. God hates sin but love sinners. Here read soalm five, read other passages that that tells us that God hates the wicked and and the point is for you, if you are a Christian because you love God, because you cherish God's glory more than anything else than by virtue of who he is and what he has done for you in the Gospel, then his enemies are your enemies. Now you are still called to pray for those enemies. Two share the gospel with those enemies, but at the same time your love for God necessitates a kind of righteous hatred toward them, while in the midst of you...

...praying for God to save them, and given God's intimate knowledge of you, that he knows you exhaustively, that he's with you, inescapably, that he designed you meticulously. This is exactly how you ought to respond to God, with fierce loyalty. Love what he loves, hate what he hates. And finally, importantly, the third response is one of humble surrender. Notice first twenty three. Search me, Oh God, and know my heart, try me and know my thoughts and see if there be any grievous way in me. So this is important to counter what we just saw. David's not only going after the evil that's outside of himself, he's also taking on the evil that's inside of him. He's inviting God to dig deep into his inner being, past even the sins that he may be aware of. He's saying, search my thoughts, way, my motives, my conscience. It feels clean, but I admit I don't even know my own motives most of the time. So God, break every lock, open every door, sweep out every corner of every room, exposed and remove anything that is within me that causes you grief or pain. So, friends, before you get too upset at David for his hatred of God's enemies, you need to see that there's something he hates just as much, if not more, than the sin of other people, and that is his own Sam and his third response is the humble surrender of himself. Why does he do it? Why does why is he willing to be laid bare before God? Well, for the same reason that you would agree to go under a surgeon's scalpel for exploratory surgery so that if anything is discovered there, he might cut it out at its root. Search me, Oh God, no, my heart, try me and know my thoughts and see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting. Who is this God who knows you? As as God's grand narrative unfolds through scripture, we discover that his fullest, final revelation of himself is found in his son, the God man, Jesus Christ as the son of God, Jesus knows you exhaustively, Peter says to him when Jesus restores him to ministry. Lord, you know everything. Jesus is with you inescapably. I am with you always, he says to his disciples. Before he ascends to heaven. Jesus meticulously designed you, Colossian says for by him, by Jesus all things were created, and in him all things hold together. Jesus will bring about your ultimate awakening. He says in John's Gospel. I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet he will live. But Jesus is not only the divine God. Jesus is also, at the same time, fully and truly human, a man, the man, we might say, and as a man we see his response. He was full of praise and adoration toward God, he was fiercely loyal to God and he was humbly submissive before God, all of which was never more powerfully displayed when, on the cross, the father searched him and found only your grievous ways. God Knit Jesus together in his mother's womb, and God fore ordained every hour of his life. And it was God who, just as David Declares here, awakened Jesus from death. And now Jesus is the one you must follow if you desire the way everlasting, the way of eternal life. This morning, I want you to know that you are known intimately by Jesus. He knows you, and he knows you better than you know yourself. Does that terrify you, or does that comfort you? It all depends upon the present nature of your relationship with him, a relationship that you can set right by turning from your sin and placing your trust in him. Loan. Only only Jesus Christ can lead you in the way everlasting. Let's pray our Triune God, you made us, not...

...we ourselves, and so we are not our own, but belong to you. As Christians. We have been bought with the price, and we are now your people, the sheep of your pasture, and therefore we kneel and fall down to worship before the Lord, our maker. God. Just as we are known by you and desire to know you, may we also know and be known by our brothers and sisters in Christ, and may we see all of your image bearers as you see them, as lost sinners in need of a loving savior. God, grant us the courage of our convictions for the glory of Christ. We pray Amen.

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