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Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx
Grace Bible Church - Gatesville, Tx

Episode 118 · 1 month ago

In The Upper Room: A Primer On The Holy Spirit (P. 1)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In The Upper Room: A Primer On The Holy Spirit (P. 1)

John 14:16

Dax Bryant: Preaching

Sometime during the first several months of seventy two ships across the Atlantic Ocean between the harbors of London and Savannah, Georgia. One ship was carrying a man by the name of George Whitfield, who was coming from London to the colony of Georgia. Whitfield had already been used in a mighty way by God preaching the Gospel in England, and he departed for that mission field of Georgia, confident and expectant that God would do even greater works. The other ship was coming from Savannah to London, and it was carrying another man by the name of John Wesley. Wesley was coming back home to England from Georgia, broken, distraught and defeated. His brother Charles had returned from Georgia back to London just a couple of years earlier, equally devastated it the Wesley brothers. They went to Georgia believing that if they served God with great effort, with personal sacrifice, that they could somehow earn God's favor. Before he left to go, John Wesley wrote in his journal, my chief motive is the hope of saving my own soul. But it wasn't long until both brothers were back in London, not only suffering from ill health, but spiritually despondent and empty. John Wesley wrote again after he returned, he said, what have I learned? What I least of all expected, that I, who went to America to convert others, was never myself converted to God. When his brother Charles heard a rumor of his own death, he said, happy for me. Had the news been true, it would have saved a world of misery for me. Now, Whitfield and the Wesley brothers, all three of these men lived in the same era. They were all intelligent men. They all were Oxford graduates each other. They knew each other well. They had significant abilities and gifts, all of them. They ministered in very similar contexts and situations, yet they had different results, different experiences. What explains the difference, Well, at this point in history, one major thing separated Whitfield from the Wesley brothers in that George Whitfield had been born again, which was something that the Wesleys had yet to experience. Imagine that they've been in the church, they've been involved in ministry, they've been sent as missionaries. Compare that to Whitfield One of George Whitfield's biographers wrote this about him and his ministry. He said God had granted upon him and his ministry a mighty effusion of the Holy Ghost. The language is a bit archaic, but you can tell what he's saying. He says it was this divine power which was the first secret of his success. You see that the ministry of George Whitfield in the eighteenth century was just another installment of the promise that Jesus made in the Upper Room on the night before his death, that that whoever believes in me will also do the works that I do, and greater works than these will he do, because I am going to the Father. Greater works. We talked about that a few weeks ago, the the advancement of the Gospel the salvation of sinners, not because of man's efforts or abilities, that's the error that the Wesley's initially made, but greater works only by the power of the spirit of the...

Living God, who dwells in believers and enables them to accomplish those greater works. Now that that should sound familiar if you've been here the last few weeks, and in fact, this is probably a good place to just pause and read our passage again John fourteen twelve through seventeen, because I want us to get a sense of the context before we narrow in again on just a single verse this morning. So beginning in verse twelve, Jesus says, truly, Truly, I say to you, whoever believes in me will also do the works that I do, And greater works than these will he do, because I am going to the Father. Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it. And we talked about what that meant in relation to the greater works verse fifteen. If you love me, you will keep my commandments and connects that verse to what was just said. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another helper to be with you forever, even the Spirit of Truth, whom the world cannot receive because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, for he dwells with you and will be in you. And so especially as we are coming to versus fifteen, sixteen, and seventeen, we are pressing the brakes here in this study of the Upper Room Discourse to ask a couple of important questions related to the Holy Spirit. It's this doctrine of pneumatology the study of the Holy Spirit. By the way, if you are interested in studying that, probably in more detail than what we might be able to cover through some sermons, I would commend this book to you by Sinclaire Ferguson. It's not so creatively titled the Holy Spirit, but it is a good book. It's a slightly academic. He also has Sinclaire Ferguson does on the Ligonnaire website. If you go there a free twelve session teaching teaching um series on this very subject called who is the Holy Spirit? So if you want to learn more or see his perspective, I encourage you to check out those resources. But we're thinking about the Holy Spirit. We really started thinking about this last week, and the question we asked last time as we looked at verse fifteen was to whom is the gift of the Holy Spirit given? And the simple answer that we drew from the text was the gift of the Holy Spirit is given to those whose relationship to Jesus Christ is characterized by obedient love. Right Verse fifteen if you love me, you will obey my commandments, and I will ask the Father to send another health Now for today and actually for the next two following Sundays, We're going to ask a second question that will really be the basis for all that is to come. So here's the second question that will guide our next three weeks. Who or what is the Holy Spirit? Who or what is the Holy Spirit? It seems like a pretty simple, basic question, and in answering it, I hope that I don't say anything new or that you don't learn anything new if you've been a Christian for several years. But it is good, as we're saying, to remind ourselves of these truths. Who or what is the Holy Spirit? It's a basic question, but it is a very important question given all of the confusion that surrounds the person of the Holy Spirit, even amongst professing Christian...

You've seen it, perhaps you've run into it. People attribute all kinds of craziness to the Spirit. You might even have cult members show up on your doorstep claiming that the Holy Spirit is just God's power in action. How will you respond to that? That the claim that the Holy fairs the Holy Spirit is more of a force, not a person, not a not a he, but in it's not a who, but a what. So the question is is phrase very deliberately, who or what is the Holy Spirit? So let's look at John fourteen, verse sixteen, and I will ask the Father, and he will give you another helper. Now, before we attempt to answer the big question we're asking, we have to pause here for just a moment. Whomever or whatever this helper is, Jesus says here in verse sixteen that he will ask the Father to give the helper to his disciples. Now, I don't want to get off in the weeds on this. It's really beyond the scope of what we're talking about today, but it is important to know a little bit of our history, as Christians were often ignorant of church history, and this verse touches on a very important theological issue that we at least need to be aware of because it's something that has divided the Eastern Church and the Western Church for a thousand years. The point of division is this, from whom does the helper proceed? Or we might ask you this way, who is it that thins the helper? Is the helper sent from the Father or from the sun. Here in verse sixteen, the son asks the father, and the Father will answer the son's request and give this helper. And if you look down to verse twenty six, that seems to be supported there also because Jesus says that the Father will send the spirit in his name. But then if you go over a chapter to chapter fifteen, verse Jesus says that he the son will send the helper from the Father, and again over one more chapter to chapter sixteen, verse seven, that he the son will send the helper when he goes. So you see the dilemma. Who who is it that sends the helper? Is that the Father, is that the son? And and at the heart of the issue is was this sending just a temporary historical reality or was this sending of the helper? Does that say something bigger about the internal relationships between the Father and the son and the helper. The Eastern Church says that the helper proceeds from the Father. The Western Church, as we read in the nice scene Creed together says that the helper proceeds from the Father and the son. It's not the original version of the Nicene Creed actually, but we won't go on into that if if you're into church history, if you're into theological debate, you can you can look up the Filioch controversy later on this afternoon, if you have some free time, or if you get that book from Ferguson. He deals with this issue a little bit um in chapter three and and maybe it's something we'll try to handle in some more detail when we get to some of those other passages that come later. But for now, let's get back to this big question. Who or what is the Holy Spirit? What does Jesus say Versus John fourteen, Verse sixteen, I will ask the Father and he will give you. And now I want to zoom in on these next two words. You will give you another helper, another patas, the Greek word coming from two Greek...

...words joined together para alongside of claytos to call someone to come alongside of you, and and call now. Outside of Scripture, this this word paratas carries a variety of different meanings. It can refer to an attorney who advocates for a defendant, a mediator who intercedes for a third party, a person who rushes to the front line to rally the troops. Most fundamentally, this word means someone who possesses the ability to give help, someone who has the ability to give help. And so you'll see if you have an E. S V or an N A S B translation in front of you, that the term paratos is rendered helper, which is a fine translation. That's the one I prefer, as long as you don't carry over the ideas that we have associated with the English word helper, where we we tend to think of a helper as an assistant, uh subordinates and an inferior and apprentice. That's not the idea. The King James version, if you happen to have that translates this as comforter, which in the language of the day was a pretty good translation, because the word comfort then meant to strengthen, to encourage to to give aid. But as D. A. Carson points out in his commentary to Modern Ears, a comforter sounds like a quilt or a do good or at a wake. The CSP the Christian Standard Bible uses the word counselor, and that's not wrong either, as as long as you don't think of a camp counselor or a marriage counselor. The idea is more like a legal counselor. But even then, the ministry of the paraklitas transcends the the legal sphere, so you run into the same issue. The n I v Uses the word advocate. So we've got all these possible meanings, all these different translations. How can we know what Jesus has in mind when he uses this word here? And the answer is, it's the same way we determine the meaning of any word. It's by examining the context. So what's the context. Well, they're in the upper room, his men are distraught, and Jesus is speaking words of comfort by promising his men that he will ask the Father to give them another paraclets, another person who possesses the capability of giving help. What kind of help? Well, as we'll see in the rest of the story of the Bible, the Spirit helps the disciples in many many ways. But here Jesus has something specific in mind, and we'll get to that next week, Lord Willing, But but for now, I want you to notice something in the text that is so obvious that it's easy to miss. Namely, this Jesus doesn't just promise to ask the Father to send help. He asks the Father to send a helper. That's an important distinction. He's not asking for a power force or a a fog to descend. He's talking about a person. Here, a paraos is a person, a helper, a counselor a comforter and advocate. So who or what is the Holy Spirit? I'm going to give you two answers to that question today. Here's the first. The Holy Spirit is a person who has all the qualities of personhood. The Holy Spirit is a person who has all the qualities of personhood.

That single, very basic fact will keep you from a lot of confusion and will guard you from the many distortions surrounding the Holy Spirit today. The Holy Spirit is a person who has all the qualities of personhood. Now, when we think about God the Father, we easily think of him as a person. Right, Even the word father is is deeply personal and relational, and we pray to the Father. The Father watches over us, he protects us, he provides for us, he loves us. He even disciplines us. So we would never call the Father it because we recognize the Father as a person. And how much more true is that with the Son right he is the baby in Bethlehem he's the carpenter from Nazareth. People saw him and heard him and touched him. We would never call the son it because he obviously a person. He took on human flesh. But when it comes to the Holy Spirit, the idea gets a little bit fuzzier for people because spirit is is less obviously a personal term than father or son. And then there's the old language the Holy ghost, which makes him sound like a phantom or an apparition of some portist. It's not it's not very helpful in envisioning him as a person. So who or what is the Holy Spirit? I want to zoom out from this word. Now we zoomed in on this word to see that that he is a person. I want to zoom out and see what the rest of the New Testament teaches us about the personhood of the Holy Spirit. That he indeed is a person who has all the qualities of personhood. So what does that mean? Well, don't feel like you have to turn to all of these references. But one mark of personhood is a will, the ability to choose. When Paul writes about the different spiritual gifts that are given to the body of Christ and First Corinthians twelve, verse eleven, he says, this, all these, all these gifts are empowered by the one and the same Spirit, who apportions to each one individually. Listen as he wills. Who is it that distributes spiritual gifts? Who determines which people get which gifts? The Holy Spirit does according to his own individual will. It's a mark of his personhood. Another quality of personhood is emotion. Did you know the Holy Spirit has feelings? In the context of condemning sinful speech, Paul says in Ehesians chapter four, verse thirty, and do not gree of the Holy Spirit of God by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption, So catch that the Holy Spirit can be grieved. He has feelings, He has emotions. It's another quality of his personhood. Another quality of personhood is intelligence. Paul says again, this time in First Corinthians chapter two, verse eleven. For who knows a person's thoughts except the spirit of a person, which is in him. He's saying, no one, but you really knows what's going on inside your head. And then he continues, no one comprehends the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God, meaning the spirit of God knows the mind of the Father. He comprehends the thoughts of God. In other words, he has intelligence. It's yet another quality of personhood. So I just want you to simply see this, that we're talking about a person. He has a will, he has emotions, he has intelligence. Beyond that, he does things that only a person can do. In First...

John fourteen, you saw that. Jesus says, the Spirit will teach you. In John the Spirit functions as a witness. In John eight, he acts as a prosecuting attorney. In John sixteen thirteen, he guides people into the truth. These are these are activities that can only be accomplished by a person, not a force. How about this one, Did you know that the Holy Spirit praise for you? You ever had those times in your life where circumstances have you so upset and overwhelmed that you don't even know the words to pray. If you're a Christian, you're not left alone to fend for yourself, then, because that is exactly the scenario in which the Holy Spirit promises to pray for you. Paul says it like this in Romans eight. Likewise, the Spirit helps us in our weakness, for we do not know what to pray for as we ought, But the Spirit himself intercedes. And this next word is very important, intercedes for us, meaning on our behalf, with groanings too deep for words. Some people like to focus on the groanings there and say that this verse refers to a private prayer language or something like that, But that preposition for us can't be overlooked. There it doesn't say the Spirit praise in us or through us, but for us. So this verse is about the Spirit, not about not about us. The Spirit intercedes for us before the Father romans, and he who searches hearts knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for the saints. There it is again, but listen to this. He intercedes for the saints according to the will of God. That's very good news because not only does the Holy Spirit pray for you, but when he does pray for you, he prays exactly according to God's will, almost like he steps in and says, Father, forget what that bozo Jes said. This is what he really needs, and he always gets it right. The point is this is this is praying for you is something only a person can do. Another thing the Spirit does that reveals his personhood. He issues commands. In the book of Acts, chapter eight, the Spirit commands Philip go over and join this chariot. And Philip obeys, and what does he find. There's an Ethiopian eunuch reading Isaiah fifty three, his heart being prepared for conversion to Christ. Did you realize that the Holy Spirit is the one who appoints elder is in the church. In Acts twenty, verse eight, Paul says to the Ephesian elders, pay careful attention to yourselves and to all the flock in which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to care for the Church of God, which he obtained with his own blood. That's humbling frightening that that it's the Holy Spirit who decides who leads a church that ought to have at least two meetings for us number one elders ought to take their calling to hold that office very seriously, very humbly. And secondly, the congregation ought to consider this when they are tempted to perhaps maybe criticize their leaders on every point. Not that the leaders will always get everything right or will be perfect, but that it is the Holy Spirit who appoints elders of the church who makes them overseers. So the Holy Spirit is a person. He's got all the pities of of...

...personhood, right, a will, emotions, intelligence, But then again, he does things that only a person can do. He teaches, he guides, he witnesses, he helps, he prays, he commands, he appoints. But what might be the most obvious proof of all of his personhood is simply that the Holy Spirit is called he. That sounds also incredibly basic, but this is actually a big deal. We we don't really have this in the English language. In Greek, like in maybe Spanish or something like that, nouns have a a gender category that are attached to them, right, And that's not really true in English except for when the gender is implied and obvious. So in English, for example, the word boy is masculine engender, right, so we use the masculine pronoun he to match that. We would not call a boy she or it. Similarly, when the noun girl is used, it's feminine engender, and so we would use the feminine pronoun she to match that. We would not call a girl key or it. But a word like chair is neuter engender, so we would use the neuter pronoun to match it. It. We don't call a chair he or she, at least not yet in our society. Up until about five minutes ago, this was uncontroversial. But um, now it's a big mess. But I'm just talking about basic rules of grammar here. So here's what's interesting. All of that to say this. The Greek word for spirit, numa is neuter engender. It's not masculine, it's not feminine, it's it's neuter. So if the Biblical authors wanted to follow basic rules of grammar, what pronoun should they use to match the neuter term spirit? It? Then pronoun it? But what do they do instead? Look back at John? We keep going there, John. But when the helper comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of Truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me. He not it or one more example, because it's still frequent in here, Chapter six, verse thirteen. When the Spirit of Truth comes, he will guide you into all truth. For he will not speak on his own authority, But whatever he hears, he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come you. You get the idea the biblical authors intentionally break the rules of grammar to demand the neuter pronoun it be used and instead use the masculine pronoun he. Why because they know the answer to our first question that the Holy Spirit is a per person who has all the qualities of personhood. Who or what is the Holy Spirit? Second part of our answer is that the Holy Spirit is a divine person who has all the qualities of Godhood. So he's not just a person who has all the qualities of personhood, but he is a divine person who has all the qualities of Godhood. Where do we get that idea from? While there are there are many places that speak of the Holy Spirit as being on equal footing with the Father and the Son. You can think about the Great Commission at the end of Matthew's Gospel, where we're told to baptize people in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit would be an example. But I want to zoom back in to John fourteen, verse sixteen, where Jesus says, and I will...

...ask the Father and he will give you. And I want to focus on this word now, he will give you another helper, another helper. That's interesting. If the Holy Spirit is another helper, who's the first helper? Listen to first John, chapter two, verse one. John writes, we have an advocate. Can you guess what the underlying Greek word there is? We have a paratas, same word that's used in John fourteen sixt We have an advocate with the Father. Who is it? Jesus Christ the Righteous? On this night in the upper room, as Jesus speaks to his men, reflecting back, looking at the last three years of his ministry among them, what has he been doing. He's been helping them, teaching them, strengthening them, comforting them. It's even what he's doing at this very moment in the text, isn't it. But but here's something also significant. Back to John fourteen, verse sixteen. We we translate the English word another from one of two corresponding Greek words. So we either get another from the Greek word heateras, which means another of a different kind. You'll recognize that in the word heterosexual, another of a different kind, or from the Greek word alice, which means another of the exact same kind. In John fourteen sixteen, when Jesus says he will give you another helper. It's Alice Pats another helper, a helper of the act same kind, which means, just from this text, that the Holy Spirit is a person, just like Jesus is a person, but also that he is a divine and perfect person, just like Jesus is. The deity of the Holy Spirit is wrapped up with the deity of the Sun. There are two helpers of the exact same kind. And so we see he's not only a person, he's a divine person who has all the qualities of Godhood. And now what does that mean? So now I want to zoom back out one more time and let's look at some of what the rest of the New Testament says about the Spirit having the qualities of godhood. You're familiar with with this passage, I'm sure in the Book of Acts if you look at chapter five. Actually, the very end of chapter four is where the story really starts. I guess where. At the end of chapter four we read abou this man, it's very generous man named Barnabas, who sold a field and he gave the proceeds to the church. And then notice Acts five, Verse one begins with the word but right, So in contrast to this very generous man Barnabas and any sense of fire. Or they sold some property too, but they kept back some of the proceeds for themselves, right, which in and of itself is not a problem. The point is they were misrepresenting what they were actually doing. And now look at chapter five, verse three, as they are confronted about this. But Peter said, and Annius, why has Satan filled your heart to lie to the Holy Spirit and to keep back for yourself part of the proceeds of the land while it remained unsold? Did it not remain your own? And after it was sold, was it not at your disposal? Why is it that you have contrived this deed in your heart? You have not lied to men, but to who? But to God? He says, So in verse three...

...he's lied to the Holy Spirit. In verse four he's lied to God. So either Peter gets very confused in a short amount of time, or he means what he says that the Holy Spirit is fully God in every sense of the word. Do you realize that the Holy Spirit has all of the attributes of God, just as the Father and the Son do. Look at what Jesus says there at the end of John fourteen sixteen, He will give you another helper to be with you forever, literally, to be with you to the end of the age where the sense is, to be with you into eternity. And Hebrews nine fourteen calls him the eternal Spirit. We find him on the very first page of the Bible, existing before creation. Genesis one, verse two talks about the Spirit of God hovering over the waters. He's He's there again on the very last page of the Bible in Revelation twenty two, right alongside the church anticipating the return of Christ, where says the Spirit and the bride say come. The Holy Spirit is eternal. Listen to some of the other ways the Spirit is described. First. Peter four fourteen calls him the Spirit of glory, Romans eight two calls him the Spirit of Life. Hebrews ten calls him the Spirit of grace. Now think about that, Think about those terms. Who who is being described by terms like that eternal, glorious, life, giving, full of grace. John fourteen seventeen Jesus calls him the Spirit of truth. We're gonna spend next week just looking at at that little phrase, the Spirit of truth. But that's interesting because back in verse six, Jesus just said I am the Truth, but the Spirit is the truth also, And of course most often he's called the Holy Spirit. He has that one quality that over and against everything else else sets him apart as God holiness. Isaiah forty, verse thirteen describes the Spirit as all knowing. Psalm one nine describes the Spirit as present everywhere. There's nowhere you can go away from him. Job thirty three actually uses the name El Shadai the Almighty to refer to the Spirit as being all powerful, omniscient, omnipresent, all powerful, omnipotent. Who who does this describe all of the divine attributes belong to God, belong that belonged to God, belonged to the Holy Spirit, And the Holy Spirit does things that only God can do. The Spirit inspired the scriptures? How else? How else do you explain this collection of writings from sixty six books, forty plus authors, all communicating one comprehensive, connected message that is in complete harmony with itself without error. Peter says, no prophecy of scripture comes from someone's own interpretation, for no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man, but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit. This this book was produced by the Spirit of God. It is illuminated by the Spirit of God so that we can know God. The virgin birth of Jesus was the work of the Holy Spirit. Remember, Gabriel shows up and tells Mary, You're gonna give birth to the Messiah. And she says, I don't know how that can happen, because I've never even had relationship with a man. And the and the Angel says, the Holy Spirit will come up on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. The Spirit does things that only God can do, including very importantly participating in your salvation. And all three members...

...of the Trinity work in cooperation to secure eternal life for God's people. The Father chose a people to save from eternity past. The Son died to save those people for whom that the Father chose, and the Holy Spirit causes those people for whom the Son died to be born again. The Father saved us motivated by his goodness and loving kindness and mercy. Titus Paul talks about Entitus that the Holy Spirit is poured out on us to make us new on the basis of the redeeming death of Jesus Christ, who justifies us. So all three persons are involved in salvation, but in particular, it's the work of the Spirit that applies the finished work of Jesus Christ to your soul, because it is the Spirit who regenerates your heart, who makes you knew, who causes you to be born again. And not only that, he illumines your mind to understand the truth. He sanctifies you over the course of your life. He purifies you, He prays for you, he guides you, he gives you gifts, he comforts you, he strengthens you. And he does all of that as a result of dwelling within you. As here this as the personal guarantee of your full experience of salvation, which is yet to come. Right. Ephesians chapter one talks about believers beings field with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of this Spirit. Is the guaranteed down payment of the eternal life that is given to a believer. And what that means is if it wasn't for the gracious work of the Holy Spirit in your life, believer, you would not be saved, nor would you remain saved. Who are what is the Holy Spirit? It's a person who has all the qualities of personhood, and he is a divine person who has all the qualities of godhood. Now, very briefly, and I mean that two great truths about the Holy Spirit here that we've seen should drive us to at least two great responses. We could say more, we'll just keep it to two. First of all, how we respond to this about the Holy Spirit. First of all, this ought to drive us to worship, because we worship to try You and God, Father, Son, and Spirit. We worship the Father and the Son who have sent the Spirit to us. We worship the Son, who's redeeming work is the basis for the Father giving the Spirit to us. And we worshiped the Spirit himself for taking the redeeming work of the Sun and applying it personally to our lives, for for making our dead and hardened hearts soften and come alive. So we ought to worship in response to this. Secondly, this ought to drive us to pray, because when you think about what it is exactly what the Holy Spirit does in salvation, what his role is do you know what that should compel you to do? Ask him to do that, Pray that he would convict people of sin and righteousness. Petition him to make dead hearts come alive. Those are things that we can't do. Only God the Spirit can do this, and so we have to pray. That's what we must do in response to Holy to who the Holy Spirit is at least that And it is the experience of the Holy Spirit in his life and the knowledge of what...

...he could do in the lives of others that is what drove the missionary zeal of George Whitfield. But sadly, getting back to our illustration, that experience of knowing the Spirit, it was something that the Wesley brothers knew nothing about. That is until May, when Charles Wesley encountered the life giving, regenerating, saving grace of the Holy Spirit and realized for the first time that forgiveness was not found in his own accomplishments, but only in the finished work of Jesus Christ. His brother John was saved on May. Just three days later, the Holy Spirit had done his work and the Wesley brothers were new men. Just two days after Charles was born again, the day before John, he composed to him that was meant to serve as a testimony of his dramatic conversion. We're gonna sing it here in just a few minutes. It's called and can it be? And the fourth verse reads like this, The Wesley brothers were not Calvinists, but you wouldn't be able to tell it from this verse. Long, my imprisoned spirit lay fast, bound in sin, and nature's night, thine eye diffused a quickening ray. I woke the dungeon flame with light. My chains fell off, My heart was free. I rose went forth and followed thee and the and the heart's response to the saving work of the Holy Spirit. Amazing love. How can it be that thou, my God, shouldst die for me? This is the spirit that God the Father and God the Son has given to us. This is who the Spirit is, a person with all the qualities of personhood, and a divine person with all the qualities of godhood. And this is what the Spirit does. This is his work and ministry, and it's the very same work that he's done in you. If you are a believer, and lastly, if you're here this morning and you've not experienced this, if you know nothing of this spirit dwelling within you, nothing of this Jesus. But suddenly you are aware in your inner being of your sin, of your guilt before God. If you suddenly have a desire to turn from sin and and trust Jesus, I would just simply say, for now, don't ignore that, don't don't let that sit and then dissipate. Respond to that right now where you are, because that is the work of the Spirit of the Living God, making your heart come to life to know these things and to respond to these things. And if you if you want that, you just simply cry out to God to make that happen, and He'll do it. You can't do this on your own. You need the Spirit of God to to cause you to do it. So don't wait. If that's you, come to him. Now. Let's pray. Father, I pray that and what we've learned you would be glorified, that your son Jesus would be exalted and magnified in his rightful...

...place. And that even this prayer I trust is accompanied by the Holy Spirit. And I pray that the Spirit would do his work of taking the truth of your word and applying it to our hearts. And changing us, molding us into the image of your son, all to the praise of your glorious grace. We ask these things, Amen,.

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